Ptosis


What is ptosis?

It is a drooping or falling of the upper eyelid. The lid may droop only slightly, or it may cover the pupil entirely. Some patients with ptosis may have difficulty keeping their eyelids fully open and then the ptosis can restrict and even block normal vision. Some patients may arch and raise their eyebrows to compensate and elevate the droopy eyelids. The drooping may be worse after being awake longer, when muscles are tired. Ptosis may interfere with vision or if can be a concern due to appearance.


What causes ptosis?

There are many causes, including age related weakening of the muscle, trauma, and congenital weakness. The most common kind of ptsois occurs because as we all age, the tendon that attaches the levator muscle that lifts the eyelid can stretch and cause the eyelid to drop. Ptosis may also occur following routine cataract surgery due to stretching of the muscle or tendon. Children can be born with ptosis.


Can Ptosis Be Corrected?

Dr. Mihora can correct ptosis surgically and usually involves tightening the levator muscle to elevate the eyelid through either an incision in the eyelid crease or the undersurface of the eyelid. In severe ptosis, when the levator muscle is very weak, a “sling” operation may be performed, enabling the forehead muscles to elevate the eyelid(s). Dr. Mihora will perform testing to determine the best form of correction for you. The goal is to elevate the eyelid to permit a full field of vision and to achieve symmetry with the opposite upper eyelid. The surgery is done with IV sedation and local anesthetic as an outpatient procedure. Patients return in about a week to remove sutures. Most patients can return to relatively normal activities within about a week. Dr. Mihora looks forward to meeting with you to discuss your individual needs, as well as the benefits and risks of surgery n order to help make the right decision for you.


Before & After Photos

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo


The patients below was presented with Congenital Ptosis

Congenital Ptosis Before and After

Congenital Ptosis Before and After Photo


Before and After Ptosis

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ectropion, Eyelid Laxity, and Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ectropion, Eyelid Laxity, and Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

Ptosis Before and After Photo

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